Days on Trails

Knowledge base

Lists, tips 'n tricks to make your life easier!

Gear! What do I need to do this?

Example kit lists

Your gear is potentially more important for your well-being than anything else. Please make sure to bring the best you can. It’s the basis of your safety and comfort. Getting a full set of quality hiking gear will certainly lighten the wallet… but on the other hand, good items will last you many years and you don’t need to buy them again often as they’re built to last and most packing lists share nearly all the basic items. You’re not wasting money. You’re investing in a lifetime of healthy outdoors adventure!

We roughly distinguish between summer and winter conditions, winter conditions meaning potentially temperatures below freezing at some point. The second distinction we make is bivouac style trips (aka you carry your shelter and need to set it up) or hut / ho(s)tel trips. You will soon find out that the backbone of all kit lists largely overlaps. It’s more a matter of upscaling or downscaling. We’ve provided printable tick box lists and detailed descriptions of items we mention. Enjoy!

An example of a packing list for a guided trek in non-winter conditions during which we will spend our nights indoors. Note: Since this list assumes you are a participant and omits items a guide or independent hiker might use.

An example of a packing list for a guided trek in winter conditions during which we will spend our nights indoors. Note: Since this list assumes you are a participant and omits items a guide or independent hiker might use.

An example of a packing list for a guided trek in non-winter conditions during which we will spend our nights in tents we carry ourselves. Note: Since this list assumes you are a participant and omits items a guide or independent hiker might use.

An example of a packing list for a guided trek in winter conditions during which we will spend our nights in tents we carry ourselves. Note: Since this list assumes you are a participant and omits items a guide or independent hiker might use.

Food! Fuel for adventure!

What to expect from eating on the trail and tricks to keep it tasty!

If you’re not used to trekking, chances are you think of your daily meals as breakfast, lunch and dinner with something in between. While trekking, this isn’t always the best plan. We’re well aware that food planning can be confusing, especially if you’re new to the game, so we took some time to compile some summary advice! After reading our rough guidelines, you can browse the internet for great recipes!

So you’ve heard that dehydrated food is thé way to go lightweight and have just spent weeks home prepping dehydrated meals – but – we can’t stop for 1 hour to cook every time we want to fuel?! Oh no! Or you really like that type of juice and brought about 5l of it to give you moral boosters throughout the week, but turns out schlepping it uphill isn’t the best idea…

You’ll laugh! But these are things that have actually happened on our trips! We’ve taken the time to give you some advice on what to expect from eating while trekking and how to prepare for it.